The process of finding a school for our son started in a very high-tech manner: The Ministry of Education had prepared a cool-looking website, and we have logged into it right after it was made online. We have answered tons of questions, and very carefully registered our preferences for 5 different schools, all of them conveniently close to us or where we work. Then we started to wait. Our reasoning was that, we would be able to register our son in one of those schools that we really liked. After all, if the first school was full, and the second, and the third… well at least the fifth choice would be available.

The time has passed and we have received the result, in the form of an official, formal letter, telling us that none of those schools had places for our son. We should go and find another school. We looked for some explanations in that letter, none to be found. After some inquiry, we were able to learn that, for example, in the first school our son was on the waiting list, as the 49. pupil. Again, we did not have any idea why he was 49th, and not, for example 10th.

Apparently having a nice web site, and spending parents’ time by forcing them to answer tons of demographic questions do not lead to a satisfactory result on behalf of them. And we are talking about a city, Antwerp,  whose population is only about 500.000 people, not millions of people. I suggest that, if the Ministry of Education is so keen on gathering data from us, it does some data science and statistics and calculate some trends about the growth of population growth and match this with the number of required schools so that parents do not face such frustration.

In our case, we are still searching for a school that is convenient for us and our son.