A kid has to know his particle accelerator: our family visit to CERN

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About six years ago, when I visited CERN for the first time, I found it a very inspirational place and promised myself to bring my son here. Fast forward six years, and this summer I had the opportunity to bring the whole family, including my son who’s now 7-year-old, and his brother, a 10-month-old, to this unique scientific center that found so many answers about the microcosmos, as well as serving as the birthplace of many technologies that we take for granted today, such as the World Wide Web.

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It was a pleasure to visit the current exhibitions at CERN, and get away a little from the scorching hot weather of Geneva in July, 2018. My 7-year-old was duly impressed and ran from one place to another, asking me something like 100 questions/minute, exhausting me a little more than the Sun outside 🙂 I tried to quench his thirst for knowledge with my poor understanding of particle physics, and tried to divest the topic to big data processing on which I could talk more comfortably.

Maybe in 6-7 year later, I’ll have another excuse to visit CERN: our baby will be about 7 years old, and the older son will be about 13-14 years old. Next time, I’ll try to reserve a guided tour, so that their questions will be answered better. And who knows, maybe we’ll come across a Nobel laureate or two while wandering the long corridors of this temple of science.

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Achtung Baby: An American Mom on the German Art of Raising Self-Reliant Children

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It’s been a while since I’ve read and reviewed a parenting book, therefore, when my brother’s wife recommended a parenting book with a catchy and interesting title, I took note of it. I decided to read “Achtung Baby: An American Mom on the German Art of Raising Self-Reliant Children” in Germany, during our trip to Schwarzwald (Black Forest), enjoying the perfect weather and scenery, while sipping my drink at the pool, German kids running around me (with a few Swiss, French and British kids added to the mix).

As a father of a 7-year-old & a 10-month-old living in Belgium, and frequently making trips to Germany and the Netherlands, I found the book more informative on what happened to USA in the recent years, rather than how Germans, particularly Berliners, raised their kids. I found the book not only very readable, but also it provided me with the perfect contrasts between Europe and USA. A striking theme of the book was the irony of the “freedom rhetoric” of USA, and how at the same time children were so much controlled by their parents, coupled with “parent’s rights”, and not much about children’s rights (the Wikipedia article titled “U.S. ratification of the Convention on the Rights of the Child” sheds more light on it). Another striking point was how happy the author, a mother of two children, felt because of the social safety net provided for families, as well as the ability to take 2 weeks of uninterrupted vacations with her family (that she found ‘luxurious’).

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